Live Oak County Historical Commission
Live Oak County Historical Commission

Live Oak County Historical Commission (LOCHC)Events  

First Baptist Church George West Texas Historical Marker to be unveiled Sunday, April 18, 2021.

 

First Baptist Church, George West, The "Church with a Mission Heart", unveiled their FBCGW Texas Historical Marker this Sunday, April 18 at 2:00 PM. Pastor Bobby Hendrick, County Judge Jim Huff, and LOCHC Chair Mary Margaret Campbell along with the people who are FBCGW in joint effort with Live Oak County Historical Commission invited the public including all past members to this celebration of First Baptist Church George West church history.

 

The FBCGW church family officially began on April 6, 1919 in a printing office in the new town of George West, Texas. George West, town founder, donated original meeting space and two lots, as he did for each faith group in the new town.

 

Descendants of FBCGW charter members are still active in the church. Church membership grew. They purchased new property and served by supporting new churches, meeting personal needs of people and churches during crises, and working daily with other church faiths and community needs in Live Oak County. Global ministery serves physical, social, and spiritual needs. That's how First Baptist Church, George West meets their mission, "Love God. Love people".

LOCHC Quarterly Meeting upcoming April 18, 2021. Dobie West Performing Arts Theatre, George West, 5:30.

AGENDA

LIVE OAK COUNTY HISTORICAL COMMISSION

Monday, April 19, 2021, 5:30 PM

 

 

 1. Call to order

 2.  Moment of Silence

 3.  Introduction of visitors; recognition of anyone wishing to address the Commission

 4.  Approval of January 18, 2021, Minutes

 5.  Reports of officers and chairs of standing committees:

  • Financial Report—Leslie Walker, Treasurer
  • Marker Chair Report—Richard Hudson, Chair
  • Website Report—Janis Hudson, Webmaster
  • Oral History Report—Glynis Strause, Chair
  • Archeology/Endangered Properties Report—Jim Warren, Chair
  • Publicity Report—Richard Hudson, Chair
  • Education Report—Nancy Coquat, Chair
  • Cemetery Report—Bernard Lemley, Chair
  • Hospitality Report—Charlotte Schroeder, Chair

 6.  Website Contract Renewal

 7.  First Baptist Church-GW Marker Unveiling Report

 8.  Live Oak Courthouse Centennial Celebration Report

 9.  Report by Glynis Strause of recent address to LOC Commissioners Court

10.  Signage on IH-37 for Geronimo

11.  West Hotel

12.  Texas Rangers Project

13.  Update on Open Meetings Act Requirement

14.  Review of reimbursement requests before submission to the county treasurer

15.  Report on Friends of the THC Real Places 2021 Conference

16.  Ask if any Appointees wish to address the Commission.

17.  Work sessions, if needed, for standing committees

18.  Adjourn  

 

The public is invited.            

       

LOCHC 2021 Schedule of Meetings:

January 18, Monday Quarterly LOCHC meeting. Dobie West Performing Arts Theatre, George West, 5:30 PM.

 

April 19, Monday Quarterly LOCHC meeting. Dobie West Performing Arts Theatre, George West, 5:30 PM.

 

July 19, Monday Quarterly LOCHC meeting. Dobie West Performing Arts Theatre, George West, 5:30 PM.

 

October 18, Monday Quarterly LOCHC meeting, Dobie West Performing Arts Theatre, George West, 5:30 PM.

Mary Margaret Campbell sworn in as new LOCHC Chair

Mary Margaret Campbell is sworn in by Live Oak County Judge Jim Huff as the new Live Oak County Historical Commission Chairman. Standing in the back (from left) are county commissioners Emilio Garza, Richard Lee, Donna Mills, and former Commissioner Willie James. For the full story see Feature Article-Mary Margaret Campbell New LOCHC Chair. Photo by Jeff Osborne.

Cox Caliche Stone Stagecoach Stop Preservation Moves from Lagarto to Old Oakville Jailhouse Square.

Gipper Nelson placing some of the last stones on formation of Cox Stagecoach Stop in Old Oakville Jailhouse Square. Two restored cottages in background. Brick walkway for site visitors. Cox served in Texas Republic's Navy before Texas was a state and later built his home and Stagecoach Stop near what is now the ghost town of Lagarto in Live Oak County. Gipper joined LOCHC Appointees about 2016. Albert Davila, who's madeone of his life missions preserving Live Oak County history, joined him in moving the almost lost remains of the Cox Stagecoach Stop from an isolated, almost impossible to reach site to the Old Oakville Jailhouse Square on an Interstate 37 access between San Antonio and Corpus Christi below. 

Throughout Live Oak County History, many sites and artifacts share beautiful and rugged memories. "The creation of the present [Live Oak] county boundaries was by legislative act approved on February 2, 1856. (LOCHC History of the People of Live Oak County, Texas-1981:7.)

 

The old Cox Stagecoach caliche foundation stones are all that is left of one of the major stagecoach stops through Live Oak County in the last half of the nineteenth century. Moving those stones to a visible site took several years. The project was completed in December, 2020. It now seems a perfect segue to 2021.

 

The above synopsis begins this preservation story initiated by Live Oak County Historical Commission Appointee, Charles "Gipper" Nelson. Gipper is a descendant of Cornelious Cox who left this legacy.

 

State historical markers are one way of permanently preserving history. However, a building or artifact moved from its historical site must wait another 50 years before becoming eligible for a state maker. Some buildings and artifacts are fragile or decaying. Moving them to a useful site may save them from neglect and decimation. Placing a marker in a desolate and almost inaccessible location assures both. So sometimes, the choice to relocate is the most pragmatic.

 

Albert Davila and his wife, Mari, continue saving such buildings and artifacts of Live Oak County early days at the Old Oakville Jailhouse Square. Thanks belong also to people who donate these buildings and artifacts as well as those who do the work. Check out the results of the Davilas' project of historic Live Oak in the Progress Dec. 25, 2019 article. Gipper saw that his family's heritage was much better served at Oakville than in its isolated location near old Lagarto.

Caliche ruins of the CC Cox Stagecoach Stop were probably more delight than surprise when Gipper Nelson happened upon them. Deciding to retire in the homeland of his ancestors' sometimes brought more adventure than Gipper expected. Gipper loved his Live Oak relatives even as a boy. In return, they told him stories of their past and passed on artifacts representative of those stories. There is just something special about coming home again.

 

The editor of the Live Oak County Herald on September 18, 1841 reported that Cornelius C. Cox was born in Ohio, lived in Tennessee as a boy, came to Texas and served in the Navy of the Republic of Texas before Texas became a state.

 

According to Live Oak County historian, Ervin Sparkman, Cox made many contributions to Live Oak County after he decided to make it his home. He not only bought a ranch near Lagarto, a thriving pioneer community, he built his home and store near Lagarto also. He became a Live Oak County Commissioner in 1865. He owned a store from 1866-1875 and sold it to HB Newberry. In 1885, Cox served a second time as County Commissioner. From 1887 until 1899 Cox was the Live Oak County Judge. His memoir "Reminiscences of C.C. Cox" was published by The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association. Vol 6. No. 3 (Jan.1903. 204-235). This memoir leaves a rich history not only of events of our state and country but the changing culture of that period. Photos above and below are courtesy of Gipper Nelson unless otherwise stated.

CC Cox was one of the early stagecoach owners in the Lagarto area. Buildings in the area at the time were most often built with caliche and wood. Without proper preservation both are subject to deterioration by sun, rain, time, and other climatic irregulaties. Very few remains still exist, are deteriorated and now covered by undergrowth. Albert Davila (right), and one of his crew begin the hard work of removing these large stones quarried around 1858 from a nearby caliche pit. More to come tomorrow. 

The work is hard but Gipper, Davila, and crew perservere. After all they are preserving history and letting us peak into the culture of a time we know too little about.

Caliche is unlike other stones. The word "caliche" is Spanish in origin meaning "porous materials that have been cemented by calcium carbonate". It is found as particles and even as subsurface layers in a variety of soils and arid-to semi-arid climates. Live Oak County lies between the semi-arid inner ranges of South Texas and the Texas Coastal Bend of the Gulf of Mexico. For early settlers, caliche was an abundant stone found in rocks small to large and even in layers thick and deep enough to quarry.

 

In early 1800's settlement periods, people found a conglomerate of beautiful fertile valleys closely allied to semi-arid conditions. As a result, the land had not been filled with settlements. Historically before that time, the area was a passageway between more easily settled areas from every direction. For these primary settlers seeking to build homes and communities, caliche became a go to building product. Large stones were quarried nearby and made safe, sturdy homes and stores. 

 

However, porosity of caliche rock with its collection of silt is vulnerable to a harsh clmate. Live Oak's clmate varied from hot summers to seasonal hurricanes and infrequent ice storms. Over the warming years since the nineteenth century, areas of caliche dwindled. Near Lagarto, a small region of mountains called "Los Picachos" had beautiful white peaks. These have seemed to melt in the sun and rain. Building constructions from the quarried stones have all but disappeared. They can be preserved today, but these strategies were little known in the 1800's. 

 

Caliche edifices of the 1800's are almost extinct. This makes Gipper's and Davila's efforts all the more historically important today. 

 

 

 

Gipper, Davila, and crew continue work removing caliche stones from the original Cox homeplace.

 

 

 

 

 

Bernard Lemley and Albert Davila discuss Cox legacy and the importance of this preservation project.

 

 

 

The work is not easy. Gipper and Davila are happy for all the help they have.

 

 

Old CC Cox Stagecoach Stop ruins begin to take shape at Oakville Square. Other edifices ready for highway and or destination views at the Square are visible in background.

Gipper Nelson placing some of the last stones on formation of Cox Stagecoach Stop in Old Oakville Jailhouse Square. Two restored cottages in background. Brick walkway for site visitors.

Final resting place for CC Cox Stagecoach Stop remains at Old Oakville Jailhouse Square just off Interstate 37 access at Oakville between San Antonio and Corpus Christi. Cox Stagecoach Stop remains join the Recorded Texas Historic Landmark Oakville Jailhouse, also in the National Register of Historic Places, and many other Live Oak historic buildings and artifacts at the Square. 

Quarterly Meeting Announcement:

 

LOCHC FIRST 2021 QUARTERLY 

MEETING NOTICE


LIVE OAK COUNTY, TEXAS  HISTORICAL COMMISSION

 

WHEN:  Monday, January 18, 2021, 5:30 to 7:30 PM

WHERE:  Buck West House, 400 N. Nueces St., George West, TX

 

 

 

Photo from George West Chamber Wesite.

LOCHC FIRST 2021 QUARTERLY MEETING AGENDA

 

The Live Oak County Historical Commission may discuss and/or take action on any of the following items:

 

 1. Call to order

 2.  Introduction of visitors; recognition of anyone wishing to address the Commission

 3.  Pledges of Allegiance

 4.  Election of officers for 2021-2022 biennium

 5.  Responsibilities of a county historical commission and its appointees

 6.  Approval of October 18, 2020, Minutes

 7.  Results of Website Proposal vote taken via email

 8.  Reports of officers and chairs of standing committees:

  • Financial Report—Leslie Walker, Treasurer
  • Marker Chair Report—Richard Hudson, Chair
  • Website Report—Janis Hudson, Webmaster
  • Oral History Report—Glynis Strause, Chair
  • Archeology/Endangered Properties Report—Jim Warren, Chair
  • Publicity Report—Richard Hudson, Chair
  • Education Report—Chairmanship now open [Nancy Coquat accepted]
  • Cemetery Report—Bernard Lemley, Chair
  • Hospitality Report—Chairmanship now open [Charlotte Schroeder accepted]

  9.  Live Oak Courthouse Centennial Celebration by Nancy Coquat & MM Campbell

10.  Wreaths Across America report by Peggy Skoruppa

11.  Notification of Section 106 filing

12.  Goals for 2021

13.  Review of reimbursement requests before submission to the county treasurer

14.  Ask if any Appointees wish to address the Commission.

15.  Work sessions, if needed, for standing committees

16.  Adjourn

Live Oak County Historical Commission

This notice posted the 14th day of January 2021.

 

Mary Margaret Campbell, Chairman

Live Oak County Historical Commission

P. O. Box 476, George West, TX  78022

 

THIS MEETING IS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

Our last 2020 Story:

 

National Wreaths Across America (WAA): 

 

Saturday, December 19, 2020, the LOCHC partnered with Live Oak County Cemetery Associations, Veterans of War Post 6119, and American Legion Post 413 to remember Live Oak County Veterans in National Wreaths Across America. A virtual tour of Live Oak County's WAA 2020 Veteran's Memorial begins on LOCHC Events page. Last year full celebration and history of WAA in 2019 Archive. Refreshments were served at George West Cemetery by LOCHC. Memorial WAA Schedule included Oakville Historic Texas Cemetery,George West Historic Texas Cemetery, Gussettville Cemetery, and St. George Cemetery.

 

Memorial services of the highest standards honor men and women of Live Oak County who served in our American Armed Forces in this National Veterans' Memorial. Photo credit to Peggy Skorupa.

 

"Taps" back story at the closing of Oakville Historic Texas Cemetery Memorial. HoorahCapella lyrics for Taps at the end of George West Historic Texas Cemetery's Memorial services.

Note: No link on this page is intended to be a product advertisement. Links are chosen solely on the basis of their addition to historical and informational content.

 
Live Oak County Courthouse

The Honorable Jim Huff, County Judge for Live Oak County, welcomes you to the Live Oak County Historical Commission (LOCHC) Website. The Live Oak County Historical Commission is an arm of the Live Oak County Commissioners' Court; appointees are selected at the beginning of odd numbered years and serve two year terms. Judge Huff and the Live Oak County Commissioners support and approve actions of the LOCHC in coordination with the Texas Historical Commission (THC).

 

Live Oak County Commissioners:

Precinct 1: Richard Lee

Precinct 2: Donna Kopplin Mills

Precinct 3: Mitchell Williams

Precinct 4: Emilio Garza

The Commissioner's Court is committed to the preservation of our county's history. Judge Huff and your local commissioner welcome suggestions.

The Honorable Jim Huff, Live Oak County Judge.

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